Brawn hints at change in engine regulations

skysports.com

It appears like Formula One may apply hybrid technology more tactically in engine regulations being drawn up for 2020, motorsport managing director Ross Brawn said on Wednesday.




Brawn knows that there can be no possible return to the raucous, normally-aspirated V12 engines of old, but said that the F1 hierarchy is looking to bring back some of the key qualities of the past.

“Hybrid technology is probably going to be retained because it offers some relevance, and the engagement of manufacturers,” Brawn said.

“But can we turn it round a little bit and make it a tactical quality so that in the race you’ve got much more capacity to use the battery power and the hybrid power to try and get an advantage?”

Brawn used the example of Mercedes’ Valtteri Bottas who had used his saved up battery power to pass the Williams of Canadian rookie Lance Stroll for second place at the finish in Azerbaijan last month.

Brawn said the new engine needed to be “more exciting and accessible” and “probably not such a major performance differentiator”.

The new power unit under discussion with current manufacturers and others would be the first since the V6 turbo hybrid era replaced the normally-aspirated V8s in 2014. Brawn was quick to point out that it would not satisfy everyone.

“It’s not a question of finding a sort of middle ground where you don’t offend anyone because I don’t think that would be the best solution,” he said.

After he spoke, an array of cars from Formula One’s past and present did demonstration runs in London’s central Trafalgar Square ahead of this weekend’s British Grand Prix.

Brawn said fans who wanted to go back to the normally aspirated engines did so because they missed the emotion, noise and revs.




“So can we create a hybrid engine that has that noise and the revs and the appeal?” he added. “I think the manufacturers involved in Formula One know that’s the key element, because they need to have a successful Formula One.

“It’s no good having an engineering exercise that demonstrates your technology if nobody’s watching.”

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